The National Finals Rodeo History’s

The National Finals RodeoEven though the sport of rodeo has been around for decades, the National Finals Rodeo, or NFR as it is commonly called, has a much more recent history. The first National Finals Rodeo was held at the Dallas State Fair Grounds in 1959, and since then, the NFR has gone through many interesting changes including a name change in 2001 to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

Said to have been the brain-child of South Dakota legend Casey Tibbs, the idea behind the first ever National Finals Rodeo was to bring together the bets rodeo athletes and the toughest livestock in the world. Many now-famous cowboys competed at that first NFR including Tibbs, Jim Shoulders, Jim Bynum, Jack Buschbom and Dean Oliver. No one quite knew what to expect but hoped for the best since this was the first ever world championship of rodeo. The cowboys who entered competed for the first NFR purse of $50,000!

Shoulders, still considered the most successful cowboy ever with 16 world titles, placed in six bull riding rounds in 1959, walking away with the NFR prize money and the world championships. In 1979, Jim Shoulders was honored in the inaugural class of the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Placing sixth in the rankings, Tibbs rode in his final saddle bronc riding world championship during that 1959 National Finals Rodeo. Today Tibbs is remembered as the first cowboy to capture the hearts and attention of the media. Tibbs was also inducted into the Hall of Fame, with the additional honor of being depicted in the museum’s signature statue — a 20-footer of Tibbs riding a bronco named Necktie.

Jack Buschbom won in the first round of the 1959 National Finals Rodeo’s bareback riding and continued on to claim the NFR average crown and world title. Twenty years later, he, too, was inducted into the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame.

For many years the NFR flourished, spending a few years in Los Angeles and then another 20 years in Oklahoma City. Cowboys still worked toward what became known as “the Last Rodeo,” but the media attention and purses did not really grow until the NFR moved to Las Vegas, Nevada in 1985. The NFR always appealed to those cowboy athletes as a culmination of that year’s hard work. With the move to Las Vegas, the appeal doubled — in the form of a total of $1.8 million in prize money.

The performance of rookie calf roper Joe Beaver was arguably the most unpredictably exciting event in that first Las Vegas Finals. Very few had heard of him before that week, but with a roll of Vegas luck Beaver took the world championship and became one of the best known cowboys in rodeo. In that very same 1985 Vegas NFR, rough stock sensation Lewis Field of Elk Ridge, Utah, easily captured the world bareback riding title in what became his first of three world all-around championships.

The 1998 National Finals Rodeo counted Ty Murray as the new champion when he won an unprecedented seventh world all-around title while Dan Mortenson garnered his fifth world saddle-bronc riding title, falling just one short of Tibbs’ long-standing record.

Many rodeos have come and gone since then and world titles can be won and lost in less time than the 8 second buzzer but the excitement never dims at the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas, and the lights never go down even after the cowboys go home.

Fitness Success Habits II

In this post we will continue our previous discussion about fitness success habits to help you break your training plateau. Here are the next success habits for your training;

Select “money” exercises: simply put, some exercises deliver a lot more benefit than others. Multi-joint, compound exercises like snatches, cleans, squats, dead lifts, lunges, step-ups, bench presses, chest presses, seated rows, bent over rows, standing overhead presses, lat. Pull downs, pull-ups and chin-ups should make up the core of your exercise selection. No matter what your goals are you will get far better results by making the exercises listed above the core of your training program.

Keep a training log: If you want to see progress from your training, don’t leave things up to guess work. Remove all doubt and start tracking things. Track your progress via measurements such as body fat percentage, girth measurements, and body weight. Your training log can help you learn from your prior mistakes and help you achieve the results you are looking for at a faster rate.

Track what you eat: some experts say that 75-80% of your overall results are totally due to your nutrition. This may be surprising to you but you can gain muscle or lose fat on the exact same program. Your nutritional intake will totally dictate your results so if you really want to make some progress it can be a good idea to periodically track what you eat so that you can make sure that you are eating in a manner supportive to your goals.

Periodically evaluate your progress or lack thereof: no program works forever and no matter how effective a given program was you should mix things up when you are no longer seeing results from your efforts. The only way to judge the effectiveness of a training program is by the results it is producing or not producing. Some experts recommend checking your progress every 1-3 weeks to see if you are improving in the areas you want to. If you are not seeing improvements then that should be a mental note for you to make some changes. If you are seeing results, keep training until that program no longer delivers.

Find a great training partner: a great training habit that has the potential to improve your fitness results is to find a dedicated training partner. Choose carefully. You want someone who will challenge you, someone positive, someone to keep you on track, and someone who will help improve your training. You don’t want someone who is unreliable, negative, and lazy. Choose wisely and this training habit could mean renewed progress!

Find coaches and mentors: coaches and mentors can help save you lots of frustration. Coaches and mentors have been there before and help you achieve better results at a faster rate. They know little tricks to help you get back on track towards the results you want, so do yourself a favor and invest in yourself by learning from these experienced teachers.

There you have it, the success habits to help you break through those stubborn training plateaus. Implement some of these suggestions and i am sure that you will get back on track towards your fitness goals. Enjoy your training and keep focused on your goal.

Train with purpose.

Fitness Success Habits

Fitness Success HabitsAre you dissatisfied with your current training program? Are you not achieving the results you had hoped for when you started training? If you are you stuck on a fitness plateau and are in need of some tips on how to start seeing progress then keep reading.

I am sure you want to see results from your training program (why would you do it if you didn’t want to see results, right?). You can start seeing measurable results again and break through those training plateaus by incorporating one or more of the following success habits for successful gym training;

Set clear goals: Unfortunately a lot of people head to the gym without clearly identifying what it is exactly that they want to achieve. I suggest you nail down a specific goal to train for.

Have a plan: Now that you have a compelling goal to train for you need a plan. I hang out in gyms a lot and most of the time I see people wandering around the gym with no plan at all. If people do have a plan that they are following, often times the plan is not appropriate for that individual. The best advice I can find is to get an individualized plan suited to the goals you have laid out.

Use progressive overload: “If you do what you have always done, you will get what you have always gotten.” You need to progress in order to make your body change. This is a key habit that should be followed when it comes to training the human body. In order to see the physical changes you are looking for, you want to focus on improving from workout to workout. You can perform one or more reps than last time, lift a slightly heavier weight, and do the same amount of work in less time. The key is to challenge the body by progressively and systematically overloading the body in an intelligent manner.

Utilize planned variety: On average, the typical individual will adapt to an exercise program in 3-6 weeks. If you have been following a specific routine and you are not seeing results, then it is probably time to start mixing things up. You can change all kinds of things to get some needed variety in your program.

You can change the overall format (switch to circuit training, supersets, etc.), change the number of sets, change the number of reps per set, change the rest periods between sets, change the exercises you are using for a given muscle group, change the grip or hand position, and you can even change the speed of movement for the exercises. The options are almost unlimited so don’t bore your muscles with the same old exercises with the same old 3 sets of 10 repetitions. Variety is the spice of life and a key factor in seeing continued progress.

Motivating the Students in Physical Education Class

Every physical education teacher should able to motivate their students by constantly challenging them and encouraging them to reach their physical goals. A physical education teacher must perform their own professional development to stay current with the times and learn new techniques to motive their students. The five tips below are simple, yet many physical education teachers do not stress on a daily basis.

Be willing to gain more knowledge: As a physical education teacher you to be interested in learning about new activities and games, plus incorporates them into their lesson plans. A teacher that is never satisfied with gaining knowledge is a good teacher. As a physical education teacher you should never be satisfied with teaching the same skills over and over again, year after year. You should research and find new games to bring into your class. By bringing in new games it will not only broaden students’ knowledge of new skills, but they will also have fun learning new and different skills.

Be encouraging: This enables students to help increase confidence and decrease doubt and failure. This is important because as a teacher you should want to build up your students’ confidence. When you encourage your student and tell them that they did a great job in performing a certain skill, it will motivate the child and help build their confidence and improve their overall self-esteem. The opposite is criticizing a student. By doing this you are destroying a student’s confidence. If you tell a child they did a horrible job performing a skill, not only will destroy the students’ self-esteem but you will also decrease their willingness to participate in your gym class. And that should not be the goal of any physical education teacher.

Be passionate about teaching: It is important to be passionate about what you teach. If you are not passionate and giving it your all, the students will pick up on that. It is important that your students can see how passionate you are about physical education, and in return they can become passionate as well and want to live a active and healthy life.

Stay organized: Being organized is an extremely important skill for a teacher to have. If you are going to teach a lesson on the volleyball set, it is important to have an organized introduction, fitness activity, and at least three setting activities thought out and planned out ahead of time so that the class runs smoothly and effectively.

Keep an emphasis on safety: The safety of your students is one of, if not the most important thing you can emphasize. A physical education teacher always needs to be focused on injury control. You want your students to have fun, but you also want them to have fun in a safe and orderly environment. It is important that you establish safety guidelines to your students, and they are aware of the consequences if they do not follow those rules.